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The Brice Family Tree Genealogy

Elizabeth Brice (1741-1798)
5th Great Grandmother
Donald Scott Lee Brice Family Pedigree
Donald Scott Lee (1945)
Mother
Marilyn Maxine Miller (1924-1996)
Grandmother
Jesse Jewel Heath (1905-1973)
Great Grandfather
John James Heath (1881-1920)
2nd Great Grandfather
Theophilus Berrian Heath (1846-1926)
3rd Great Grandfather
Rigdon Heath (1791-1864)
4th Great Grandfather
Rigdon Heath (1767-1799)
5th Great Grandmother
Elizabeth Brice (1741-1798)
Brice Family Ancestors and Genealogy
Elizabeth Brice (1741-1798)
5th Great Grandmother
Elizabeth Brice married Colonel William Heath (1726-1782) in Craven County, North Carolina in 1760. (ref. U.S. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783) The Colonel served for the state of Virginia. In 1769, William was living in Craven County, North Carolina. (North Carolina, Compiled Census, 1790-1890) William and Elizabeth were living in Isle of Wight County, Virginia in 1782. (ref. Virginia Compiled Census Index, 1607-1890). Elizabeth and William had at least five children: Jeremiah, Rigdon, Elizabeth, Winnifred and another daughter Hollon(?). (William Heath Will)
Francis Brice (1703-1736)
6th Great Grandfather
Francis Brice was the son of William Brice II. He was the brother of John Acton, Rigdon and William. Francis
William Brice, II (1708-1753)
7th Great Grandfather
William Brice II was born in Craven County, North Carolina. He was the brother of Francis, Elizabeth Fonville, and Eliza Brice. His mother was Ann Fonville. His father was Colonel William Brice.
Colonel William Brice (1670-1718)
8th Great Grandfather
Colonel William Brice was called “Brousse”. He was born in France. Colonel ‘New Bernian’ William Brice owned land in the area where Prices Creek joins the Trent River. Colonel Brice came to the New Bern area in the early 1700’s. He played a pivotal role in the Tuscarora Indian War.
The Tuscarora War 1711-1715
The Tuscarora War was fought in North Carolina during the autumn of 1714 through 11 Feb 1715 between the British, Dutch, and German settlers and the Tuscarora Native Americans. It was considered the bloodiest colonial war in North Carolina. The Tuscarora were defeated and signed a treaty with colonial officials.
The principle targets of the Tuscarora in the war were the planters along the Roanoke, Neuse and Trent rivers and the city of Bath. The first attacks killed hundreds of settlers, inducing several key colonial political figures, such as John Lawson of Bath and others. Baron Von Graffenried, who was a prisoner of the Tuscarora during their raids recounted stories of women impelled on stakes, more than 80 infants slaughtered, and more than 130 settlers killed in the New Bern settlement.
Governor Edward Hyde called out the militia of North Carolina. Colonel William Brice was one of the six hundred militia. They attacked the Tuscarora in Craven County along the Neuse River and slaughtered more than 300 Native Americans, taking 100 prisoners. The prisoners were mostly women and children who were ultimately sold into slavery, many shipped to English plantations in the Caribbean, so they could not escape. Tuscarora War Wikipedia
The Indians mutilated many of their victims. On one such account a Mr. Nevil, living near the mouth of the Blounts Creek was treated in a barbarous manner by the Indians. He was shot and laid on the house floor. His wife was set upon her knees as if praying. Their son was laid out in the yard. They cut off the hands of a Negro slave. According to Christopher Gale, women were laid on the house floors and great stakes driven up through their bodies. Pregnant women had the unborn ripped out of them and hung on trees.
image of colonists and indians at war
Image courtesy of pixabay.com
Houses were pillaged and burned, crops destroyed and livestock killed or driven off. They were taken prisoners to serve as slaves to the Indians, after watching their loved ones and friends butchered before their eyes. Major General Thomas Pollock raised 150 men to join Captain William Brice.
Under orders by the general, Captain Brice marched his company of about 60 men up the Neuse River to the town of Bath where others were to join them. The town of Bath had just witnessed the atrocities that the Native Americans had just done, and the people were afraid to come out. Many thought that Bath was finished.
Captain Brice continued his advance into Indian Territory only to meet up with an army of 300 natives forcing him to retreat to his fortified plantation. Captain Brice’s plantation was used as a safe haven in times of violence. The colony of Virginia never sent troops to help Captain Brice and General Pollock retaliate against the Tuscarora. The Virginians had other plans. North Carolina Historicals Historic Bath: The Tuscarora War, 1711-1715
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New Bern and Bath, North Carolina Map
Marching for a distance of 30 miles through the western frontier of North Carolina, the center of Indian Territory, with a company of 60 or so of militia settlers who were mostly farmers was a lot longer way than it is in today’s world. Using old paths of the Indians and some newer built by the settlers, Captain Brice advanced on the Tuscaoras who were six times as many strong. Realizing that he did not have the man power or ammunition to kill over 300 wild natives, Captain Brice marched his men back to his plantation just north of New Bern along Brice Creek.
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Native American Tribe Map - Courtesy of WikiMedia Nikater
Book Review ‘Indian Wars’
Indian Wars by Robert Marshall Utley and Wilcomb E. Washburn
But one of his settlers, “a foolish man named William Brice took matters in his own hands and captured a chief of an allied tribe and roasted him alive. The Indian attacks increased in fury.”
On pages 71 and 72 the authors write about the Swiss contingent who went settle a tract of land at New Bern at the confluence of the Neuse and Trent rivers. When the Swiss arrived at the location they found it inhabited by an Indian village. It was suggested to the colonist by the surveyor-general that they had legal rights and drive the Indians off the land with no payments.
The authors go on to say that this was “poor advice” and on September 22, 1711, the Tuscaroras responded with and early morning attack on the settlements between the Neuse and Pamlico Sound.


A bloody morning it was for the settlers of these communities. The indians killed nearly 200 settlers that included 80 children. The survivors fled to the coast and a series of raids continued. The leader of the Swiss settlers, Baron Christoph von Graffenried, was captured and a condition for his release was to not retaliate and make war on the Indians.”
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The French Huguenots
Until the arrival of the German and Swiss settlers on the Neuse River in 1710, the center of population in Bath County remained unmistakably on the Pamlico and its tributaries. One of the centers of this Pamlico settlement lay along the banks of Old Town Creek (now Bath Creek) where Joel Martin, Simon Alderson, David Perkins, William Barrow, William Brice, John Lawson, Levi Truewhite, David Depee, Richard Collins, Robert Daniel, John Burras, Collingwood Ward, and many others owned plantations in the years immediately following the turn of the century.
Brice Creek, Craven County
The Brice Family were among the first settlers of Craven County, North Carolina. William Brice was one of those early settlers, arriving c.1701. By 1707 William Brice had acquired the first of a long series of grants on the Trent, on Brice’s Creek, holdings which were to make the Brice family, along with the Greens and Hancocks, the largest early landholders in the land of the Neuse. In 1749, Francis Brice was among those appointed as vestryman of the St. Gabriel’s Parish, at New Bern, in the upper part of New Hanover County, North Carolina. The North Carolina Historical Review

Brice Research Notes
The Brice/Brousse Family Descendants of Elizabeth Brice who married John Fonvielle in Craven County, North Carolina. Two generations listed at GeoCities.ws.
In May, 1772 Rigdon Brice deeded to william Heath land on the south side of the Trent river, Brice’s Creek. In June, 1772 William Heath bought the Manor Plantation being the residence of the late William Brice, containing 520 acres on Brice’s Creek. William Heath married Elizabeth Brice in February, 1760. AlliedFamilies: The Heaths of Craven County, North Carolina.
Yellow fever ravaged the colonists and took its toll in lives. Then without warning, at dawn on September 22, 1711, the Indians fell upon the unsuspecting settlers' plantations killing sixty English and more than sixty Germans and Swiss. Women and children were captured as prisoners with booty. So terrible was the the decimation and suffering of the people that the date of the massacre was set apart by the General Assembly as a day of humiliation and prayer and was observed annually in North Carolina for more than twenty-five years. As a result of the massacre, numbers of children were left orphans. Many were apprenticed in foster homes and fifty or more of the settlers went to Virginia. Craven County History
Family Descendants of Elizabeth Brice
The Brice/Brousse Family Descendants of Elizabeth Brice who married John Fonvielle in Craven County, North Carolina. Two generations listed at GeoCities.ws.
In May, 1772 Rigdon Brice deeded to William Heath land on the south side of the Trent river, Brice’s Creek. In June, 1772 William Heath bought the Manor Plantation being the residence of the late William Brice, containing 520 acres on Brice’s Creek. William Heath married Elizabeth Brice in February, 1760. AlliedFamilies: The Heaths of Craven County, North Carolina.
Yellow fever ravaged the colonists and took its toll in lives. Then without warning, at dawn on September 22, 1711, the Indians fell upon the unsuspecting settlers' plantations killing sixty English and more than sixty Germans and Swiss. Women and children were captured as prisoners with booty. So terrible was the the decimation and suffering of the people that the date of the massacre was set apart by the General Assembly as a day of humiliation and prayer and was observed annually in North Carolina for more than twenty-five years. As a result of the massacre, numbers of children were left orphans. Many were apprenticed in foster homes and fifty or more of the settlers went to Virginia. Craven County History
Chief Pelers of the Tuscarora Tribe
The Tuscarora people were part of the First Nations Band of Iroquoian-language family. They aligned with the Iroquois in New York because of their ancestral lineage. The Tuscarora people migrated south and settled in the region now known as Eastern Carolina. They lived along the Neuse, Roanoke, Tar and Pamlico Rivers well before the arrival of the European explorers and settlers in the colonies of North Carolina and Virginia. Wikipedia
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Image of Casper Pelers Chief of the Tuscarora Tribe courtesy of Wikimedia user Sacrehands.
Baron Christoph von Graffenried
Once in the New World, the settlers sold everything that remained, except the clothes on their backs. John Lawson took them to a site at the junction of the Trent and Neuse Rivers, which they named New Bern. The first season, the settler's crops did not do well. Graffenried returned to Europe to get supplies and additional settlers. He returned to the colony unscathed.
In addition to a lack of food and supplies, there was great tension between the settlers and the Tuscarora Native Americans of the Neuse River region. They were separated by language and culture, especially related to their differing concepts of land and property rights. The Tuscarora were an Iroquoian-speaking people, distantly related to the Five Tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy based in central and western New York.
The settlers had unwittingly planned their new settlement on the site of an old Tuscarora village. In 1711, Graffenried and the settlers evicted a group of Tuscarora from nearby lands without payment, and Graffenried assumed the title "Landgrave of Carolina." Retaliatory raids by the Tuscarora, under a leader named Hancock, led to deaths and damage to the settlement.
During the summer of 1711, Graffenried, along with John Lawson, took a trip up the Neuse River. Graffenried wanted to crossbreed European grapes with wild, native grapes and start a vineyard. The Tuscarora took captive Graffenried, John Lawson, and an enslaved African whom they had entrusted with their baggage.
While in captivity, John Lawson and Graffenried were given three separate trials, each in a different Tuscaroran village. One found the men not guilty; the other two pronounced them guilty of wrongful crimes against the Tuscarora. The Tuscarora decided to kill them but, after extended discussion over several weeks, the elders decided Graffenried would be released. He wore such fine clothes they mistook him for the governor of North Carolina.
They thought if they let the "governor" go, the colony would let the incident pass. They informed him they were planning an attack on all the settlements in North Carolina (when this took place, it was known as the Tuscarora Indian War). The next day, the natives killed Lawson after ritual torture. Graffenried was released on condition that no new European settlements should be made without the sanction of the native chiefs. When he finally reached New Bern, he found it abandoned and in flames. The Baron lost his fortune and returned to Bern, Switzerland, penniless and he died. (Ref. Wikipedia Christoph von Graffenried)
Sources: New Bern North Carolina , Steve Tyson Realtor Tuscarora Indians - Wikipedia The Tuscarora War - North Carolina Historic Sites 1711-1715 LA VERE, DAVID. The Tuscarora War: Indians, Settlers, and the Fight for the Carolina Colonies. Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 2013. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469610917_lavere.
Page Background Image Credits: Emigration of the Huguenots 1566 by Jan Antoon Neuhuys circa 1891 depicting the immigration of the French Huguenots in 1566. Oil on canvas. Image courtesy of BrightRaven at Wikimedia Commons.

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