Palisado Oakwood Machackemeck Granby Granary Copp’s Hill Maplewood

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Granby Cemetery

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Image courtesy of D. Scott Lee; Granby Cemetery 2015
The Dewey Oak Tree
Before the pilgrims first settled in Granby or even before they reached the New England shores, the Dewey Granby Oak was thriving.
It is Connecticut’s ‘ Most Notable Trees’ lists the Dewey Oak as the “most picturesque” tree in the state. It’s arms extend some 75 feet long.
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Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Rosenzweig.
Salmon Brook Historical Society
The Salmon Brook Historical Society in Granby, Connecticut has extensive files concerning Granby, East Granby and Simsbury families. Check out their website !
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Gravestones
Photo images of Grave Markers, Tombstones, Grave sites, Graveyard Sites, Grave Memorials.
Gravestone photos courtesy of D.Scott Lee.
Page Background Art
The Granby Cemetery page background image is the painting ‘A Roadside Cemetery near Neuve Eglise’ (New Church) was painted in 1917. It is a watercolor on paper painted by artist George Edmund Butler (1872-1936).
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Hannah, the wife of Judah Holcomb
1711-1765
Wife of the Justice of the Peace
1st Cousin 8xr
gravestone of hannah buttolph
Photo courtesy of D.Scott Lee; Granby 2015
It really goes without saying that all of the early families ‘resting’ in the Granby Cemetery are ‘notables’. These immigrants and their descendants lived in a time of uncertainty for themselves and their families. But, they were dedicated to making a new life for themselves, working hard, raising their children, and fighting Indians and disease. For a list of all of those buried in the cemetery visit ‘The Hale Collection’.
Besides being “Hannah, “wife of Judah Holcomb”, who was she? She was the daughter of Sergeant David Buttolph (1669-1717) and Mary Buck (1673-1761).
Hannah’s father was a ‘cordwainer’ , a shoemaker, in addition to being a ‘patriot’. Her mother was Mary Buck. Hannah was one of nine children born to her parents.
Hannah was born in Simsbury, CT, on February 20, 1711. She married Judah Holcomb on September 1, 1730, when she was 19 years old. Four of Hannah’s siblings also married children of Nathaniel Holcomb, Judah’s father.
Hannah passed away on March 11, 1765, in Granby. She had been married to Judah for 34 years. Their youngest child, Benoni, was eight years old at the time of her death.
Judah went on to live another 37 years before he passed away. In his lifetime he served as Justice of the Peace and Deputy of the Connecticut General Assembly, not too mention raising nine children. His epithet reads “Death is a debt to Nature due, which I have paid and so must you”.
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Palisado Oakwood Machackemeck Granby Granary Copp’s Hill Maplewood

Sources: LDS Genealogy; Hale Collection for Granby Cemetery; ‘The History and Genealogy of the Cornish Families in America’ by Joseph E. Cornish of Boston, Mass.,pub. 1907; U.S. Newspaper Extractions from the Northeast, 1704-1930; Rhode Island Vital Extracts, 1636-1899;
Page Background Credits: ‘A Roadside Cemetery near Neuve Eglise’ by George Edmund Butler (1917 watercolor on paper); image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons contributor Labattblueboy.
In The Chicken Coop
2018 ©
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